Groundschool Schedules

The following provide a summary of current and up and coming groundschool courses; registration for credit is open to all students who hold the qualifying prerequisite, while auditing is open to all students without restriciton.  The auditing fee is 50% of the tuition fee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part-time Private Pilot Groundschool (June 6, 2017)

Summary

Everyone interested in becoming a pilot (private or commercial) is welcome to this evening course, which began on Tuesday, June 6th, 2017, and will last until August 24th, 2017.

The class will meet on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 7pm to 9:15pm, and there is also a tutorial group meeting on Saturdays at 10am. 

To register and reserve your seat, contact Langley Flying School at 1-877-532-6461.

Those having difficulty attending on these days can register as sell-study students and have an open invitation to join any class meeting they can. All self-study students have to write the course Quizzes at the airport.

Late registrations will be accepted until July 18th.

This Private Pilot Groundschool course, is the prerequisite for the Commercial Pilot Groundschool course.

Contact a Langley Flying School Flight Instructor, for additional information.

Schedule

 

Date:

Subject:

Important Stuff:

Instructor:

1

June 06

Registration and Licensing

 

Jojhar G.

2

June 08

Airframes, Engines & Systems

 

Jojhar G.

3

June 13

Airframes, Engines & Systems

 

Jojhar G.

4

June 15

Aerodynamics & Theory of Flight

Quiz #1 Personal LicensingAirframes, Engines & Systems

Barry S.

5

June 20

Aerodynamics & Theory of Flight

 

Barry S.

6

June 22

Flight Operations

Quiz #2 - Aerodynamics & Theory of Flight 

Abinav S.

7

June 27

Flight Operations

 

Abinav S.

8

June 29

Flight Operations

 

Abinav S.

9

July 04

Human Factors & Pilot Decision-Making

 

 

Abinav S.

10

July 06

Canadian Aviation Regulations

Quiz #3 Flight Ops - Human

Factors & Pilot Decision Making

Mohit A.

11

July 11

Canadian Aviation Regulations

 

Mohit A.

12

July 13

Canadian Aviation Regulations

 

Mohit A.

13

July 18

Canadian Aviation Regulations

 

Mohit A.

14

July 20

Canadian Aviation Regulations

Transport Canada PSTAR

Mohit A.

15

July 25

Meteorology Part I General Weather

 

Lance D.

16

July 27

Meteorology Part II Active Weather

Quiz #4 Meteorology – General Weather

Lance D.

17

Aug 01

Meteorology Part III Weather Info

 

Lance D.

18

    
Aug 03

Meteorology Part III Weather Info

Quiz# 5 Meteorology - Weather Information

Lance D.

19

Aug 08

Navigation

 

Jojhar G.

20

Aug 10

Navigation

 

Jojhar G.

21

Aug 15

Navigation

 

Jojhar G.

22

Aug 17

Navigation

Quiz #6 Navigation

Robin W.

23

Aug 22

    
Radio Navigation and Flight Instruments

Quiz #7 Radio Navigation and Flight Instruments

Robin W.

24

Aug 24

Review

 

Lance D.

 

 

Aug 28th to Aug 30th - Final Exam

Class time-24 x 2:15 = 54hrs -- Tutorial time- 11 x 2 = 22hrs

 

 

Entry Requirements (prerequisites)

None.

Tuition

$400

Audit Fee (Non-credit)

$200

Groundschool Outline

Section I                                LICENSING REQUIREMENTS1

Section II                              AIRFRAMES, ENGINES AND SYSTEMS—PART I2

Section III                              AIRFRAMES, ENGINES AND SYSTEMS—PART II

Review Quiz #1: Licensing Requirements and Airframes, Engines and Systems.

Section IV                              AERODYNAMICS AND THEORY OF FLIGHT3

Section V                               CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS4

Review Quiz #2: Aerodynamics, Theory of Flight and the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Section VI                              FLIGHT OPERATIONS (Airpersonship) 5

Section VII                            HUMAN FACTORS AND PILOT DECISION-MAKING6

Review Quiz #3: Flight Operations—Part I (Airpersonship), Human Factors and Pilot Decision-Making.

Section VIII                           METEOROLOGY—PART I (GENERAL) 7

Section IX                             METEOROLOGY—PART II (ACTIVE WEATHER)

Review Quiz #4: Meteorology—Part I (General).

Section X                               METEOROLOGY—PART III (WEATHER INFORMATION)

Review Quiz #5: Meteorology—Part II (Weather Information).

Section XI                             FLIGHT OPERATIONS (AERONAUTICAL FACILITIES) 8

TRIP TO LOCAL CONTROL TOWER

Section XII                            NAVIGATION.  9

Review Quiz #6: Navigation.

Section XIII                           RADIO AND ELECTRONIC THEORY (RADIO NAVIGATION) 10

Section XIV                           FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS.  11

Review Quiz #7: Radio Navigation and Flight Instruments.

FINAL EXAMINATION12

Notes:

1 This section examines the various licences and ratings that are issued by Transport Canada, with a review of both the flying privileges of the Recreational Pilot Permit, as well as the privileges of higher ratings available to Recreational Pilots, including the Seaplane Class Rating and the Multi-engine Class.

2 The section consists of two parts, the first examines various structural and design features of aircraft, including the flight control systems and features common to general aviation aircraft, while the second part focuses on aeroplane engines and the various systems associated with the generation of propeller thrust.

3 This section focuses on the theoretical principles of flight, including the four aerodynamic forces associated with flight (lift, drag, thrust, and weight), the “stalled” conditions and factors that affect stalls, and the aerodynamic of “spins.”  Also examined in this section are the four aerodynamic “attitudes” of an aeroplane during flight—cruise, climbing, descending, and banked attitudes—and the three movements controlled by the pilot—pitch, roll, and yaw.  The somewhat different forces exerted on an aircraft during a turn are examined, and examination is also made of the various climb configurations commonly used by pilots—the “best rate” climb, the “best angle” climb, and the “en route” climb.

4 This Section examines the vast array of regulations and laws governing flight operations in Canada, focusing on the classification of airspace in Canada, the application and requirements of published “weather minimum” (i.e., minimum flight visibility and cloud separation required for the different classes of airspace), the rules associated with operating an aircraft in the vicinity of airports, both controlled (with a control tower) and uncontrolled, and the rules governing minimum and maximum flight altitudes.  This section also reviews the pilot’s legal obligations with respect to passenger briefings, the use of supplemental oxygen, flight planning, aircraft equipment, and radio communications.

5 This section focuses on operational considerations associated with flying, including pre-flight aircraft weight and balance calculations, the effects of aircraft loading on aircraft performance, landing errors, landing rules of thumb, collision risks and avoidance, bird-strike risks and avoidance, special considerations for flight over water, the effects of temperature and air pressure on aircraft performance, special considerations for flight in mountainous areas, aircraft fuelling procedures and considerations, and human factors affecting pilots—e.g., hypoxia and vertigo.

6 Going back to the early 1970s it has been realized that the in-flight “decisions” made by pilots—in particular bad decisions—have been a major cause of aircraft accidents.  This section examines the various elements of the decision-making process typically used by pilots in critical situations where flight safety is affected.  The importance of pilot “situational awareness” is examined, as well as the common factors that lead to the dangerous “loss of situational awareness” and its potential consequences.  The general attitudes of pilots are examined—both the potentially “dangerous” attitudes and the “safe” attitudes.

7 This and the following sections examine the pervasive role of weather in flying.  Weather is responsible for creating some of the most awe-inspiring conditions of flight, but it is also responsible for creating some of the most hazardous conditions.  Students are introduced to the fundamental processes that govern weather conditions and changes in the weather, with focus on the air masses commonly encountered in Canada, the atmospheric pressure changes that govern the movement of these masses, and the frontal weather that is produced where the different air masses come into contact with one another.  Students also learn how to interpret the rather specialised weather information produced for pilots and aviation in general.

8 This section of the course consists of a tour of a radar-equipped control tower in which students view first hand the highly specialized work place of air traffic controllers and the tools of their trade.

9 In this section students learn how to systematically prepare for a cross-country flight, including map reading, map preparation, flight planning (including consideration of surface and upper winds), fuel consumption planning, preparing a NavCanada Flight Plan, and conducting a briefing from a Flight Service Specialist.  Students learn how to estimate the time en route for a trip based on predicted groundspeed, and also learn how to conduct actual groundspeed checks during flight for the purpose of revising estimated landing times.

10 This section introduces students to the vast array of electronic navigation facilities that exist throughout Canada (and the world for that part) to aid pilots in air navigation.  Included is the variety of land-based electronic systems and how they work, as well as the electronic display systems in the cockpit and how the pilot interprets them.

11 The flight instruments are composed of six instruments that are positioned directly in front of the pilot.  They consist of the Airspeed Indicator, the Attitude Indicator, the Altimeter, the Turn Co-ordinator, the Heading Indicator, and the Vertical Speed Indicator.  This section examines how these instruments operate and the crucial in-flight information they provide to the pilot.

12 This final examination is designed so as to provide a highly accurate prediction on how well our individual students will perform on the Transport Canada Private Pilot examination.

Full-time Commercial Pilot Groundschool (October 23, 2017)

Summary

This 8-week course starts on October 23, 2017 and ends on November 24, 2017, and will run from Monday through Friday in the mornings, from 9:00 AM to 12:00 noon. There will also be a weekly tutorial sessions, times to be announced. 

This course satisfies the groundschool requirement for the Commercial Pilot Licence and prepares student to write the Transport Canada Commercial Pilot Licence qualifying examination.

The perquisite for this this course is the successful completion of the Transport Canada Private Pilot written examination (or international equivalent). For students who have not completed the Private Pilot written examination, but who wish to audit the course, contact the Chief Flying Instructor.

Students wishing to take this course should reserve their seats by contacting the school and have their names placed on the sign-up sheet posted in the main hallway.

Schedule

To be published.

Students must have successfully completed the Transport Canada Private Pilot written examination.

Tuition

$500

Audit Fee (Non-credit)

$200

Groundschool Outline

Section I                                LICENSING REQUIREMENTS1
Section II                               AIRFRAMES, ENGINES AND SYSTEMS—PART I2
Section III                              AIRFRAMES, ENGINES AND SYSTEMS—PART II3
Review Quiz #1: Licensing Requirements and Airframes, Engines and Systems.
Section IV                              AERODYNAMICS AND THEORY OF FLIGHT4
Section V                               CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS PART I and PART II 5
Review Quiz #2: Aerodynamics, Theory of Flight and the Canadian Aviation Regulations.
Section VI                               FLIGHT OPERATIONS6
Section VII                              HUMAN FACTORS AND PILOT DECISION-MAKING7
Review Quiz #3: Flight Operations—Part I (Airpersonship) and Pilot Decision-Making.
Section VIII                             METEOROLOGY—PART I (GENERAL)8
Review Quiz #4: Meteorology—Part I (General).
Section IX                               METEOROLOGY—PART II (ACTIVE WEATHER)
Review Quiz #5: Meteorology—Part I (Active Weather).
Section X                               WEATHER INFORMATION
Review Quiz #6: Meteorology—Part II (Weather Information).
Section XI                               NAVIGATION9
Review Quiz #7: Navigation.
Section XII                              RADIO NAVIGATION10
Section XIII                             FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS11
Review Quiz #8: Radio Navigation and Flight Instruments
FINAL EXAMINATION

Notes:

1 This section examines the licensing requirements associated with the Night Rating, the VFR OTT Rating, the Commercial Pilot Licence, the Instrument Rating, Multi-engine Class and Seaplane Class Ratings, and the Airline Transport Pilot Licence. The requirements for a Type Rating are also examined, as well personal pilot logbook requirements, and pilot recency requirements.

2 This section focuses primarily on airframe structures and systems, including load factors and airworthiness issues related to aircraft logbooks and inspection procedures. The concepts of airworthiness and non-airworthiness are examined, as well as the requirements for Airworthiness Directives and Service Bulletins. Approved pilot maintenance is also reviewed.

3 This section begins with an examination of conventional piston engines, and reviews the various systems associated with these engines, including fuel systems and electrical systems. A review is conducted of the various types of propeller systems—the mechanical and hydraulic variety—and, further, the various hydraulic variable pitch propellers—controllable pitch, constant speed, and hydromatic constant speed. Turbine Engines are also examined in this section, including the basic principles of operations (e.g., “continuous flow”) and engine components (e.g., the compressor, turbine, and combustor sections), and the design and operation of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow compressors. Turbofan engines are also examined, including the role and function of bypass air, and the two types of turboprop engines are examined—direct-drive and free-turbine turboprops. Finally, this section examines the general principles and operation of aircraft pressurisation systems, including the roll and operation of outflow valves, positive relief valves, dump valves, negative pressure relief valves, and the limitations of “maximum differential.”

4 This section begins with a review of the fundamentals of aerodynamics, including the practical application of universal lift and drag formula, flight for maximum range and flight for maximum endurance. This section also examines the role and operation of various aircraft design features such as vortex generators, wing fences, winglets (topsails), slots and slats, spoilers and speed brakes, as well as various complex flap variations such as Zap, Fowler, and Double-slotted Flaps. Finally, this section examines the concept of “critical engine” as it applies to multi-engine operations.

5 This section begins with an examination of the basic legal concept of flight operations including the classification of Canadian Airspace and the application of minimum weather requirements, but also examines the rules governing altimeter practices in the Standard Pressure Region, flight operations with respect to national security, the rules governing the use of oxygen and oxygen equipment and supply, and the rules regarding aircraft emergency and non-equipment during various types of flight operations. The section then focuses on regulations and requirements specific to the commercial pilot, with special focus of the vast array of regulations governing Air Taxi Operations, Commuter Operations (including takeoff weight limitations of commuter aircraft), and limitations of commercial pilot Duty Times and Flight Times.

6 This section on flight operations begins with review of flight administration, including such company documents as the Operations and Procedures Manual and the Maintenance Control Manual. Weight and Balance factors and concepts are then examined, including the practical determination of weight and balance for a complex aircraft such as the C-441. The formula for the operational shifting of aircraft weight is examined, as well as the calculation of weight and balance as a %MAC. Landing illusions and errors are examined, as well as issues related to hydroplaning and the practical interpretation and use of the Canadian Runway Friction Index (CRFI). Attention is drawn to the risks and dangers of mid-air collisions and bird strikes, as well as special operational consideration related to flight over water and flight over mountainous areas. The hazards associated with winter operations are reviewed, as are the application and use of de-icing and anti-icing fluids. Consideration is also given to roll upset and tail-plane stall phenomena. Fuel handling considerations are discussed, as are human factors related to aviation (e.g., hypoxia, carbon monoxide poisoning, decompression sickness, and vertigo-spatial disorientation). This section concludes with the examination of the calculation and application of aircraft Acceleration-Stop Distance with respect to takeoffs.

7 Going back to the early 1970s it has been realised that the in-flight “decisions” made by pilots—in particular bad decisions—have been a major cause of commercial aircraft accidents. This section examines the various elements of the decision-making process typically used by pilots in critical situations where flight safety is affected. The importance of pilot “situational awareness” is examined, as well as the common factors that lead to the dangerous “loss of situational awareness” and its potential consequences. The general attitudes of pilots are examined—both the potentially “dangerous” attitudes and the “safe” attitudes. This section focuses on a number of case studies of accidents involving commercial aircraft operations in which pilot-decision making was found to be a critical contributing factor.

8 This and the following sections review the pervasive role of weather in flying. Weather is responsible for creating some of the most awe-inspiring conditions of flight, but it is also responsible for creating some of the most hazardous conditions. Students are introduced to the fundamental processes that govern weather conditions and changes in the weather, with focus on the air masses commonly encountered in Canada, the atmospheric pressure changes that govern the movement of these masses, and the frontal weather that is produced where the different air masses come into contact with one another. The final section in this series on weather reviews interpretation of weather information, with special focus on application of Area Forecasts.

9 This section begins with a review of the basic terms and concepts of navigation, including a review of the errors associated with the magnetic compass. The interpretation of navigation chart information is also examined, with special consideration of information contained on WAC charts and the IFR Enroute Low Altitude Charts. The concepts of Minimum Obstruction Clearance Altitude and Minimum Enroute Altitude are examined as they apply to IFR charts. The application of the “one-in-sixty” rule is examined, and so are the concepts of “relative bearing.” Students learn the application of formula to determine both relative bearing and time/distance to station as they are applied to radio navigation. Students also learn how to determine the Sun’s True Bearing using the Transport Canada publication Finding the Sun’s True Bearing.

10 This section on radio navigation begins with an examination of VOR and ADF/NDB operational equipment, and then proceeds to examine the two broad categories of conventional radar systems—Primary Surveillance Radar and Secondary Surveillance Radar. The function and use of Airway and Airport Surveillance Radar, Airport Surveillance Radar, and Terminal Surveillance Radar is reviewed, as is Airport Surface Radar, Independent Secondary Surveillance Radar and Precision Approach Radar. The principles and operation of ILS and DME are reviewed, and so are such Area Navigation Systems as INS, RNAV, LORAN-C, and GNSS (GPS). This section concludes with an examination of navigation equipment interference.

11 This section focuses on the operating principles of the various gyro and pitot/static flight instruments, including the errors associated with their interpretation and use.

 

 

Langley Flying School Piper Cherokee departing Runway 01 at Sunset

Radio Navigation and Flight Instruments

Mohit A.

Navigation

Aug 03